Indiana Gov. Signs Bill Allowing Retail Sales of ‘Low THC Hemp Extracts’

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Indiana Gov. Signs Bill Allowing Retail Sales of ‘Low THC Hemp Extracts’ | NORML

INDIANAPOLIS, IN — Indiana’s Republican Governor, Eric Holcomb, has signed legislation, Senate Bill 52, authorizing for the retail sale of certain hemp extract products. Under the measure, retailers may legally sell “low THC hemp extract” products that possess a “certificate of analysis prepared by an independent drug testing laboratory.” The testing must confirm that the products contain no more […]

Indiana Gov. Signs Bill Allowing Retail Sales of ‘Low THC Hemp Extracts’ | The Daily Chronic

The Daily Chronic

Indiana: American Legion Calls on Lawmakers to Permit Medical Marijuana Access

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Indiana: American Legion Calls on Lawmakers to Permit Medical Marijuana Access | NORML

INDIANAPOLIS, IN — The American Legion of Indiana passed a resolution on Sunday calling on state lawmakers to permit veterans’ access to marijuana as a therapeutic remedy. The resolution acknowledges that legalizing cannabis access will reduce opioid addiction and overdose deaths, and urges members of the Indiana General Assembly to “amend state legislation to remove restrictions […]

Indiana: American Legion Calls on Lawmakers to Permit Medical Marijuana Access | The Daily Chronic

The Daily Chronic

Indiana Newsdesk, March 7, 2014 Ukraine Family & Hemp Production

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More News: http://www.wtiunews.org “Indiana Newsdesk” On this episode of “Indiana Newsdesk,” as the political situation in Ukraine changes on a daily basis, one family is stuck in Bloomington unable to return home.

Indiana could soon grow a crop that’s been illegal since the 1970s. We explore why one lawmaker is calling hemp the state’s next cash crop.

As the legislative session comes to a close, statehouse reporter Brandon Smith updates us on the key issues still being discussed.

And we speak with Greencastle Mayor Sue Murray on our “Ask The Mayor” segment.
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Bills would legalize medical marijuana in Indiana

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Bills would legalize medical marijuana in Indiana
Two Democrats — one in the Senate and one in the House — have introduced bills that would allow the use of medical marijuana in Indiana. Senate Bill 284, by Sen. Karen Tallian, and House Bill 1487, by Rep. Sue Errington, would allow people with a …
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Marijuana Penny Stocks That Outperformed in 2014
Consulting was the top-performing sector of all marijuana penny stocks in 2014, followed by biotech and infused-product companies, according to Viridian Capital & Research. “There's a demand now for experts to lead the entrepreneur through the …
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Indiana Senate Committee Unanimously Approves Industrial Hemp Bill

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Indiana Senate Committee Unanimously Approves Industrial Hemp Bill

INDIANAPOLIS, IN — Allowing farmers to grow hemp in Indiana could help boost the economy and dispel myths about a crop that can be used to make everything from paper to car parts, supporters told lawmakers Friday.

The testimony helped convince the Senate’s agriculture committee to unanimously approve a bill, Senate Bill 357, that would enable farmers to legally grow industrial hemp, but only if they or the state gets federal approval. Hemp is marijuana’s non-intoxicating cousin but it cannot be grown under federal law, though many products made from hemp, such as oils and clothing, are legal.

The bill’s sponsor, Sen. Richard Young (D-Milltown), said hemp fields flourished in Indiana before and during World War II, but petrochemical industries and other industries later lobbied against hemp — which can also be used to make fuel — to cut competition.

“This is a plant that has been used for centuries throughout the world and has tremendous potential,” Young said.

But lingering stereotypes have haunted efforts to legalize the crop ever since, said Neal Smith, chairman of Indiana National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws.

Kentucky passed similar legislation last year, and eight other states have done the same, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

The 1970 Controlled Substances Act requires hemp growers to get a permit from the Drug Enforcement Administration. The last permit was issued in 1999 – and expired in 2003 – for an experimental plot in Hawaii. U.S. Sens. Rand Paul and Mitch McConnell of Kentucky are co-sponsoring legislation that would federally legalize industrial hemp farming.

The economic benefits remain unclear, however, and whether Indiana would receive a permit is uncertain.

Still, Indiana farmers said waiting on state legislation would be a disadvantage.

“I wish Kentucky wouldn’t always be in front of us,” Indiana Farmers Union member Pam Patrick told the committee. “When I see industrial hemp, I see money.”

University of Kentucky research from last year suggested Kentucky could support about 80,000 acres of hemp that would bring in between $200 and $300 per acre, although increasing supplies could cut that to about $100 per acre. The research shows the current national market for the crop is small, and likely could only support a few dozen jobs in Kentucky.

Also in speaking in favor of the Indiana legislation were two mothers of children with Dravet syndrome, a rare childhood disease that causes frequent seizures. Cannabidiol, a chemical in hemp, is sometimes used to stop the seizures.

Brandy Barrett broke down in tears while telling lawmakers how her 7-year-old son can’t visit the zoo because overstimulation can trigger seizures.

“Help me and help all the state of Indiana be a voice for these children,” Barrett said. “Support this bill.”

No one spoke against the bill, which now moves to the full Senate.

Over thirty countries produce industrial hemp, including Australia, Austria, Canada, Chile, China, Denmark, Egypt, Finland, France, Germany, Great Britain, Hungary, India, Italy, Japan, Korea, Netherlands, New Zealand, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Thailand, Turkey and Ukraine.

The United States is the only developed nation that fails to cultivate industrial hemp as an economic crop, according to the Congressional Resource Service.

The world’s leader in hemp production is China.

Controlled Substances Act , hemp , hemp cultivation , hemp farming , IN SB 357 , Indiana , Indiana hemp , industrial hemp , Richard D. Young , Senate Agriculture and Natural Resources Committee

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