New Jersey Governor Expands Medical Marijuana Program

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New Jersey Governor Expands Medical Marijuana Program | Justin Strekal

TRENTON, NJ — In his ongoing effort to expand the Garden State’s medical marijuana program to be more patient-oriented, Governor Phil Murphy (D-NJ) has made dramatic changes to the state’s regulatory program. We will begin the elimination of the requirement that doctors prescribing medical marijuana appear on a public registry, and transition to an optional listing […]

New Jersey Governor Expands Medical Marijuana Program | The Daily Chronic

The Daily Chronic

Legislation Expands Definition of Workplace Disabilities

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Many employers encounter a big surprise when confronting a law that dramatically expands the number of people protected by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA).

The legislation, called the ADA Amendments Act (ADAAA), broadly defines a disability to include physical or mental impairments such as high blood pressure, diabetes, irritable bowel syndrome, migraine headaches and other conditions which can be mitigated through medication.  Under the ADAAA, all impairments (even if corrected with medication or other devices) are covered and protected under the ADA. The only exception is for imperfect eyesight that can be corrected with eyeglasses or other lenses.

While the ADAAA is viewed as good for employees struggling with disabilities, it’s also viewed as a challenge for employers.

The ADA covers all private employers, state and local governments and education institutions that employ 15 or more people — prohibiting discrimination against people with disabilities who are qualified for a job.

Employers are required to make reasonable accommodations for all qualified individuals with a disability unless doing so would cause the employer an undue hardship. Reasonable accommodations may range from granting extended leave or flexible hours to an employee to replacing fluorescent lighting or purchasing ergonomic work stations.

The challenge is determining what is reasonable. Obviously, the larger the employer, the higher the expectations.  To protect themselves, employers should

Review job descriptions to be sure they cover all needed aspects of each specific function. Such descriptions will serve as an employer’s defense should a disability keep an employee from performing the necessary duties required for his or her job.
Respond quickly and proactively if an employee presents with an obvious disability or notifies the employer of a disability. Be careful and diligent to ensure the disability plays no role in hiring, promoting, firing and other employment-related decisions.
Keep updated policy and procedure manuals, especially as they pertain to addressing employees’ requests for accommodations.
Engage in interactive dialogues with employees who request accommodations.
Keep detailed records of accommodations requests, including how each request is handled and the reasons for decisions made.

The law may seem intimidating for employers, but most will be protected by remembering two key points: (1) if an employee with a disability can perform all of his or her essential job functions, employers should do their best to accommodate him or her; and (2) if accommodating an employee would create a substantial hardship that can be measured and quantified, the employer may have grounds for denying the accommodation.

Originally appeared in the River Valley Business Report.

Thomas H. Taylor is an attorney with Johns, Flaherty & Collins, SC, (http://www.johnsflaherty.com), a full-service law firm based in La Crosse, Wis. According to the Martindale-Hubbell Law Directory, Johns, Flaherty & Collins, SC, has more top-rated lawyers than any other La Crosse law firm.

Colorado Cannabis Business Expands its Recycling Initiative, to Encourage Marijuana Retailers to Keep Their Businesses Green

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Denver, Colorado (PRWEB) May 26, 2015

DENVER (May 26, 2015) – As the nation’s legal cannabis industry expands and evolves, it is also experiencing many of the growing pains felt by other start-up businesses. And like their mainstream counterparts, one major issue that cannabis companies now have to grapple with is how to recycle the tons of paper and plastic that marijuana growers, dispensaries and consumers go through each year.

“Where others see waste we see the opportunity to enhance our environment for the benefit of our community, our retailers and our customers,” says Ryan Fox, founder and CEO of Kindman: one of the largest growers and distributors of legal recreational cannabis in Colorado.

Fox says Kindman is now expanding its own recycling initiative to its marijuana industry partners in Colorado – by encouraging those retailers to make sure Kindman packaging ends up in recycling bins, and not as discarded waste.

“Since opening our doors in 2009, we have actively practiced a 100 percent recycling effort,” he notes, “and as a result, we can proudly say that more than half of our waste is recycled in bins that get taken to Waste Management through their Think Green program. The other half that goes to the landfill, we make sure it’s compostable.”

By state law, all marijuana products in Colorado must be sold in tamper-proof, child-resistant and opaque containers. Those rules make the products safer and easier for regulators to monitor, but they also create the need for making our own packaging recyclable, says Fox.

With those environmental concerns in mind, Fox pioneered Kindman’s pre-packaged, pre-weighed and easily identifiable cannabis brands – and made sure all that packaging material was recyclable.

He took the extra steps to have his company use Plastic #2 – HDPE (High Density Polyethylene) bottles that are much safer for the environment, have a lower risk of leaching and are widely accepted by curbside recycling programs. Plastic #2 is often recycled into pens, recycling containers, picnic tables, lumber, benches, fencing and detergent bottles, to name just a few items.

The rest of the Kindman’s packaging, including its distinctive, forest-green boxes, are made from cardboard and paper that’s accepted by mainstream recycling companies. Fox notes that, even if his retailers don’t have ready access to the usual recycling receptacles, they can encourage consumers to place Kindman packaging in standard, curbside recycling bins.

“We excited about being part of a recycling system here in Colorado with Waste Management, that takes our recycled boxes and bottles and converts them into energy,” he continues.

“Additionally, we have a sense of pride here at Kindman, knowing that our extra efforts play a part in Waste Management’s ongoing initiative to convert our local landfills into wildlife habitats… something that’s very important here in Colorado.”

Recycling is an important part of keeping overall business costs down, but Fox says it’s also part of being an answerable partner in the Colorado communities where Kindman works and its employees live. The company also uses paperless documentation, and its daily tech operations include efforts to further shrink the consumption of paper, plastic and ink used in the state’s legal cannabis industry.

“We have taken on a role as recycling consultants, to make sure our industry goes green and stays green,” he says, “by encouraging our Kindman retailers to follow in our footsteps, and to help their own stores shrink their carbon footprints.”

ABOUT KINDMAN

Established in 2009, Kindman provides customers with an unmatched cannabis product – grown in Colorado state-regulated facilities at indoor locations, using a customized process that combines food-grade nutrients and a unique soil mix that brings out the plant’s best features. Close attention is paid to product cleanliness, quality, curing and processing.

Since the January 1, 2014 start of legalized sales of recreational cannabis to adults in Colorado, Kindman has provided high-quality marijuana flowers to tens of thousands of customers from over 100 countries.

For more information, visit: http://www.mykindman.com/

Tags: Marijuana, cannabis, dispensary, cannabis business, Colorado, packaging, recycling, carbon footprint, environment, Ryan Fox, Kindman







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(ALGA) American Seed & Oil Company Entry into $500 Million U.S. Hemp Market, Found on Bloomberg BusinessWeek Site, Now Quietly Expands into Colorado

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Dallas, TX (PRWEB) August 28, 2014

The American Seed & Oil Company, a subsidiary of Algae International Group, Inc. (OTC: ALGA), announced last week a strategy launched last January to enter the existing U.S. $ 500 million Industrial Hemp market.

The announcement can be found on Bloomberg BusinessWeek:

http://tinyurl.com/ALGA-Bloomberg

The Company subsequently released details to expand its existing hemp farming operations in Vermont:

http://tinyurl.com/Vermont-Wants-You

Today the Company made public its efforts to expand into Colorado.

In June this year, Management participated in the first annual Weed Stock Conference in Denver, Colorado.

http://www.weedstockconference.com/

At the Weed Stock Conference, the Company engaged a number of local parties in early negotiations to establish hemp and marijuana farms in Colorado. The Company is also exploring retail and wholesale operation pilots in addition to possible cannabis tourism projects.

To learn more about the Company’s cannabis business strategy and the progress to date in the development of that strategy, visit the Company’s new American Seed & Oil Company website. In particular, read ‘The Introduction Of The American Seed & Oil Company’ found on the website to specifically learn about the Company’s current hemp crop and all three new cannabis industry subsidiaries.

http://www.americanseedandoil.com/news/alga-introduces-american-seed-oil-company

About Algae International Group, Inc. and The American Seed & Oil Company, Inc.

(OTC: ALGA) Algae International Group, Inc. first became interested in the cannabis opportunity last year while attempting to build a business to produce bio diesel from cold pressed algae oil. While the ‘promise’ of the cannabis market is great, the path to achieving the ‘promise’ is unclear. An incubator improves the odds of success in an early and rapidly evolving market by building multiple, complimentary businesses with an initial strategy to explore market opportunity rather than to attempt seizing market opportunity prematurely. Accordingly, the Company is starting with three incubated subsidiaries, and will continue to explore the introduction of additional complimentary subsidiaries. As subsidiaries develop to a viable stage of independence, the Company will spinoff such subsidiaries creating independent ROI opportunities for parent shareholders.

Learn more about the incubated subsidiaries at http://www.AmericanSeedandOil.com.







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